Tag Archives: wordpress

A Blog Case Study: OSU’s Annual Personalized Health Care Conference

Wendy Philips presented OSU’s Personalized Health Care blog to the group, emphasizing the simplicity in creating a sharing tool like this. This project begn about the annual personalized health care conference four months out, promoting the event and highlighting principal leaders in the OSU Center for Personalized Health Care. During the conference, Kim Dodson blogged live, linking pictures, video and PowerPoint presentations to the page, hosting all the information in the same place. Conference attendees could follow along and provide feedback directly through the blog and those who weren’t able to attend could still follow a good amount of the content. The conference news release referred media to the blog for more information, increasing the site hits a great deal. Lessons learned: the project should have started more than four months out, a technical writer could have improved the content and more content from the client would have improved the final prouduct. All in all, it was a simple tool that didn’t take much time to create–the opportunity to engage our audience was worth it in the end.

Planning and Tweeting: A Toolbox for Marketing Professionals

Sometimes in a world of deadlines and crises, we become doers rather than planners–in some cases, there isn’t a choice. However, this work style is habit-forming and definitely not the most efficient way of project management. Mary Jones Smith, director of creative services at OSU Medical Center, took some time to highlight all the opportunities to reach audiences at OSU Medical Center and the surrounding community. She also emphasized the importance of a creative brief, something that is often overlooked in our fast-paced, needed-it-five-minutes-ago field of work. The foundation of our projects truly does save time in the long run

social-media-waste-of-timeTweeting? Facebooking? Pressing words? Linking in? YouTubing? Social Media and its programs are still a foreign language to many, even in the field of communications. Although early adopters have been experimenting with its different capabilities for a couple of years now, the programs and options are growing at an astronomical rate–really, it’s hard to keep up. Ryan Squire, program director of Social Media at the Medical Center, presented the different options available, highlighting Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN and more. He emphasized the planning stage for this communication style–eventhough it may be tempting to post things quickly in real time, a solid plan with tactics should be developed prior to tweeting and faceooking. The bottom line: the conversation has been happening for a long time and if we don’t join it, we’ll certainly get left behind.