Category Archives: Uncategorized

Twittering about Technology in Healthcare–The CITIH Conference

The Ohio State University Medical Center

twitter_logoMonique Payne discussed her experience with the CITIH conference and how she used Twitter to enhance the social media conversation. The personalized hashtag #CITIH helped her team track the feedback from the conference and the tweets were displayed on a large monitor in the conference room. Monique plans to continue monitoring these contacts and use these relationships in planning and promoting the event next year.

Here’s a transcript of the tweets.

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COM’s Leadership Insights Engaging the Conversation

Phyllis Baker talked about the Leadership Insights with the College of Medicine and also mentioned a blog in the works with Dr. Lucey and Dr. Sedmak. The goal of this blog is to position the COM in an innovative light among academic medical centers and to engage followers in conversation about sometimes controversial topics.

Viral Video Opportunities: Know the Signs of a Heart Attack

Toni Hare shared her experience with the STEMI community awareness video–they posted it on the OSU Medical Center YouTube Channel and are channeling it through bloggers, Facebook and Twitter. The goal is to get 105,000 views and at this point the views are near 2,500.

A Blog Case Study: OSU’s Annual Personalized Health Care Conference

Wendy Philips presented OSU’s Personalized Health Care blog to the group, emphasizing the simplicity in creating a sharing tool like this. This project begn about the annual personalized health care conference four months out, promoting the event and highlighting principal leaders in the OSU Center for Personalized Health Care. During the conference, Kim Dodson blogged live, linking pictures, video and PowerPoint presentations to the page, hosting all the information in the same place. Conference attendees could follow along and provide feedback directly through the blog and those who weren’t able to attend could still follow a good amount of the content. The conference news release referred media to the blog for more information, increasing the site hits a great deal. Lessons learned: the project should have started more than four months out, a technical writer could have improved the content and more content from the client would have improved the final prouduct. All in all, it was a simple tool that didn’t take much time to create–the opportunity to engage our audience was worth it in the end.

Unexpected Popularity: Facebook and The Stefanie Spielman Fund

stefspielThe Stefanie Spielman Facebook page is another great example of the possibilities with social media–the page has rapidly grown, sometimes gaining between two and 300 new fans a day. Krista Richardson explained that they hope to explore donor opportunities in the future by including a link to donate on the main page. This is also a great way to be the official source of information and use this tool to dispel any false information in addition to promoting donations and events. How did it get so big so fast? Krista used traditional media tools like e-mail lists and newsletters in addition to promoting the site through newer social media programs–the combination is really proving successful.

Wet Feet: The Cancer Team’s Use of Social Media

pelotoniaEric Geier talked about his work with The James’ Facebook page and how easy it is to use video to disseminate information. He said he typically uses these elements to display consumer information and events, like Pelotonia and Cancer Survivors Day. He also mentioned that Ryan created a hash tag for the event on Twitter, which helped us to track what attendees were saying and it also provided a nice opportunity for our team and attendees to share information. Eric said he would like to start using Twitter more regularly to target certain physicians and bloggers and build relationships with those key contacts. Tara Kuisick touched on The James Cancer Warriors Group on Facebook and how it has grown to bring together survivors of all different type of cancer–not just breat cancer. This goes back to what Beth NeCamp was talking about earlier when she discussed creating these patient communities and information sharing hubs.

What we’ve done, why, and how you can to it, too

retreatRyan Squire walked the group through OSUMC’s News and Notes Blog, touching on examples of how to disseminate our information effectively through this tool. The key here is to constantly update these pages with information–this not only makes the blog a more useful tool, it also helps when searching for content in  search engine. Google loves it when things are updated frequently! Ryan also emphasized the importance of tweeting our information and re-tweeting our collegaues’ information. Unless people help spread the content, it will just sit there. The same goes for Facebook–Kim Dodson posted a ProjectONE event to the Medical Center’s Facebook page–just another way to get content out there and engage your audience.

Tim John gave an overview of the department Wiki and all the resources it holds. He focused his portion of the presentation on posting media elements and the process for Web projects.