Category Archives: Strategy

Medical Center Adopts People-First Social Media Policy

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Today, we are beginning to tell our staff about the Social Media Participation Policy that we have created and have been communicating to managers for a month.

The entire effort was the result of an incredible collaboration between Communications, Legal, HR, IT Security, Nursing, Physicians, and our leadership that sought to find a solution that empowered use of social media while giving our managers tools to direct staff on the appropriate time and place to use social networks and other websites during the work day.

In addition to creating policy, we’ve also developed guidelines to help our people create social media that connects with their audience. 

We aren’t alone, Vanderbilt, Mayo, and the Cleveland Clinic have adopted similar policies.  Other institutions, like the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics shut down access to all social networking applications.  You can view a list of other health care organizations’ social media policies by visiting Ed Bennett’s blog.

To us, this was about balancing the attributes that create a workplace of choice and those that ensure the best care for our patients.  As we go forward with understanding, planning, and applying these social tools in health care, OSU is ready to once again, be a among the leaders.


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Policy is 1% of the Social Media Education

We are in the final stages of acceptance with our social media policy and guidelines at The Ohio State University Medical Center.  Many people have said something like, “I bet you’ll be happy when that’s all done and over.”

While it’s true that developing the policy and guidelines has been hard (and sometimes frustrating) work, actually getting a policy in place is the easy part. 

Policy is no better than the paper it’s written on or the bytes of information on a hard drive it occupies if you don’t find a way to effectively communicate what it says–both the spirit and letter.

I usually respond to people who assume the policy work is over by reminding them that the EASY part is over.  The hard part is trying to ensure that a diverse group of 16,000 people understand what the policy says and what it means for them. 

Have you had success communicating your social media policy?  I’d like to hear about what worked and what didn’t.  I know my team has a long road of teaching ahead, and want to make sure they are armed with the right tools for the job. 

Our first meeting about how to effectively communicate about social media is today, so I need your ideas soon.

-Ryan Squire

 

Why Social Media at OSU Medical Center?

OSUMC’s Chief Communication Officer, Beth NeCamp, reflected on her experience at the recent AAMC conference, emphasizing the importance of social media on both a local and national landscape. She charged OSUMC’s communications and marketing department to use social media tools to acheieve department goals and ultimately strive to align these projects with our organization’s strategic goals. The elements of social media can truly evolve everything from internal staff communications to pieces of our national reputation. Beth continued on, emphasizing the need for our engagement in these opportunities, charging the Medical Center’s communications and marketing department with adding an element of social media to our P3s for this next year.  Get tweeting, folks!

Planning and Tweeting: A Toolbox for Marketing Professionals

Sometimes in a world of deadlines and crises, we become doers rather than planners–in some cases, there isn’t a choice. However, this work style is habit-forming and definitely not the most efficient way of project management. Mary Jones Smith, director of creative services at OSU Medical Center, took some time to highlight all the opportunities to reach audiences at OSU Medical Center and the surrounding community. She also emphasized the importance of a creative brief, something that is often overlooked in our fast-paced, needed-it-five-minutes-ago field of work. The foundation of our projects truly does save time in the long run

social-media-waste-of-timeTweeting? Facebooking? Pressing words? Linking in? YouTubing? Social Media and its programs are still a foreign language to many, even in the field of communications. Although early adopters have been experimenting with its different capabilities for a couple of years now, the programs and options are growing at an astronomical rate–really, it’s hard to keep up. Ryan Squire, program director of Social Media at the Medical Center, presented the different options available, highlighting Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN and more. He emphasized the planning stage for this communication style–eventhough it may be tempting to post things quickly in real time, a solid plan with tactics should be developed prior to tweeting and faceooking. The bottom line: the conversation has been happening for a long time and if we don’t join it, we’ll certainly get left behind.